Lemon curd cheesecake.

dav

vegan lemon curd cheesecake

Everyone knows cheesecake (I guess). But the cheesecake I grew up with was not the kind of cheesecake made with cream cheese. Instead, it had curd cheese in it, and the one my mom used to bake (and still does) was based upon a recipe she had gotten from a neighbour who, in her turn, had it from her husband’s German relatives. In German, this is called Käsekuchen or Quarkkuchen. The Austrians have their own word for it, Topfenkuchen. As far as my research indicated, the correct English term would be lemon curd cheese (the recipe indeed includes lemon zest and juice). But do correct me if I’m wrong.

When turning vegan about 12 years ago, I stopped having this marvellous cake which, apart from curd cheese, also has quite some eggs. But then after analysing numerous recipes of veganised versions, I started making my own curd cheesecake based upon a mixture of silken tofu and firm tofu. It actually worked and it was quite a decent cake. But now I have been able to bring the art of lemon curd cheesecake baking to top-level quality. And all thanks to two new ingredients. The first one being the soy-based curd cheese alpro has launched  (its organic counterpart provamel did the same), and which really tastes like I recall curd cheese to taste. The second one being aquafaba (ok, admittedly, that is not something new, but the insight that this chickpea liquid actually has distinct eggwhite-like qualities still is relatively recent). The addition of aquafaba is not strictly necessary, but it does add a sublime airiness to the cake’s texture. Take these two ingredients, and you’ll get a curd cheesecake that no one will ever suspect to be vegan in the first place.

So here you go!

 

dav

vegan lemon curd cheesecake

 

Lemon curd cheesecake.

  • Servings: 12 decent slices
  • Difficulty: medium
  • Print

Ingredients

Crust

  • 300 g flour
  • 100 g vegan butter
  • 75 g cane sugar
  • 15 g baking powder
  • 1/4 cup water

Curd cheese filling

  • 2 packages (400 g each) alpro Go On plain (curd cheese/strained yoghurt)
  • 100 g cane sugar
  • 15 g baking powder
  • 50 gram package vanilla pudding powder
  • 4 TB cornstarch (maizena)
  • 2 tsp vanilla-flavoured sugar
  • 250 g plant-based milk
  • 1 tsp lemon zest
  • 2 TB lemon juice
  • liquid of 1 can drained chickpeas (about 10 TB)

Directions

Crust

Mix all ingredients and knead until you end up with a smooth ball of dough. Roll it out with a rolling pin and line the bottom and side of a (relatively large) springform pan with it. Use a fork to perforate the dough here and there.

Curd cheese filling

Whip the aquafaba until it forms stiff peaks (and you can hold the bowl upside down 🙂 ). Set aside.

Mix all other ingredients. When you have a smooth batter, gently fold in the whipped aquafaba. Pour into the springform pan.

Bake for an hour in a preheated oven on 160-170 degrees Celcius. Your cake will be rising during the baking process, but will somewhat collapse afterwards. When done baking, leave it to cool in the oven (with the oven door ajar) for 20 more minutes before removing it.

Let cool completely (and thus firm up) before serving.

 

 

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19 thoughts on “Lemon curd cheesecake.

    • Thanks for pointing out that I had forgotten to add the ‘g’ :-). So it has to be 15 g baking powder (the equivalent of one dr oetker baking powder package). I quickly adapted the recipe. – Let me know how the cake turns out if you get the opportunity to test the recipe. I’d be happy to know.

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  1. This looks awesome and delicious! How many ounces or grams of yogurt/cheese should we use? There aren’t any vegan cheese/yogurt options where I live, so I’ll have to make my own using plant-based milk. Thanks!

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    • Hi Tamara. I used 2 packages of strained yoghurt, and they are 400 g each. In your case, I’d go for the option with tofu and silken tofu (50/50), if you could get hold of that. That is how I used to make this, and the taste was also quite close to the original. Adding whipped aquafaba should also in this scenario add some air pockets to the batter. At least that would be my guess. Good luck, and let me know how it turns out, if you get the opportunity to experiment. I’d be curious to hear.

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  2. Mmmm… ziet er ongelooflijk lekker uit!

    Lieve Dhont

    2017-02-06 21:54 GMT+01:00 spoons & splatters :

    > spoonsandsplatters posted: ” Everyone knows cheesecake (I guess). But the > cheesecake I grew up with was not the kind of cheesecake made with cream > cheese. Instead, it had curd cheese in it, and the one my mom used to bake > (and still does) was based upon a recipe she had gotten from” >

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    • Hi Cornelia, I used a pan with a diameter of ca. 25 cm (or approximately 10 inch). It was brimful, so I would recommend using one this size or a tiny bit larger. The cake rises when baking, but it does not spill, even when its height exceeds the springform brim. Good luck baking! Always welcome to leave a comment after baking and eating too :-). It would be nice to know if you liked it as much as we do over here.

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  3. So, the cake was almost done when I read your reply (yes, should have asked before). Here is how it turned out: I don’t own a 25cm pan, so I used one that is about 30cm, but not as deep as yours – I was lucky, it just did not spill over. I also did not have 800g of that Alpro curd cheese (which is no real curd cheese in my opinion, it is kind of a thick yoghurt with additional thickeners and flavours). So I substituted 200g of soy greek yoghurt, 100g of soy cream cheese and 100g of coconut yoghurt I found in my fridge. That did seem to work quite well. I also added just a little bit of xanthan to the AF and another 25g of (powdered) sugar, when whipping, to give the AF more structure. As I baked with 160° C without the fan option, the AF seemed to hold up (I know it does not with higher temperatures). So in the end the cake stayed really moist, but you can still cut it. My test eater liked it, I did too 🙂 It has an interesting texture, really light, not the heavy-cheesecake-style.

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    • Hi Cornelia, good to hear that the substitutions worked out and that you and your tester liked the result. This type of cheesecake is indeed way lighter than a cream cheese-based cheesecake, which is what I like about it (although I am fond of ALL kinds of cakes and cheesecakes 😉 ). As to the taste of alpro’s Go On, it’s hard comparing it with the ‘real’ thing, not having had it for over a decade, but it comes pretty close to what I can recall (from the Belgian market, which might slightly differ in taste from other regions’ products?). But you are of course correct in pointing out it is a processed product. Still, I’m glad to have it available (less glad about alpro’s new umbrella company Danone, though).

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  4. Hey! So I did the cake for afternoon tea today here in Sweden for some non-vegan friends and they absolutely loved it!!! They even went for seconds. Served with some raspberry jam on the side. I added a dash of Xanthan and som sugar plus lemon to the AquaFaba. I might try having some almond flour in it perhaps next time and maybe even a dash of nutritional yeast to make it even more cheesy? But I dunno. Thank u so much for sharing the recipe! If u add “sulejmenp” on Insta (private account) u can see a photo of the cake!!!!

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    • Hejsan! Vad kult att ni gillade ostkakan 🙂 . Great to hear that also your non-vegan guests liked it. Did you mean adding almond flour to the crust a next time? That cannot be but tasty, I guess :-). I would refrain from using nutritional yeast, though. That is something one would rather use in savoury dishes only, not in a sweet one like this (I would think the tastes would be quite incompatible). Curd cheese or strained yoghurt is not really cheese or cream cheese, it more or less resembles very thick yoghurt. So I don’t know if one should aim for a cheesy taste? Anyhow, thanks for giving such positive feedback. Glad you all liked it.

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      • Tack! Ok interesting! I actually meant almond flour in the curd. I see, I compared it to a Swedish “ostkaka” which is both savourt and sweet at the same time…sort of. Anyway, thanks again for the recipe!!!

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  5. This looks delicious! Is there anything I can use in place of vanilla pudding powder as I’m not sure I can get that?

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